Choosing Hexagonal Tile Flooring for the Kitchen and Bathrooms

Posted By : Aubrey Mead , on Feb, 2016

 

A new homeowner who wants to create old-fashioned effects in the house might consider having the kitchen floor redone with hexagonal mosaic Tile Flooring. Particularly when installing these six-sided tiles in a white and black color scheme, the design hearkens back not only to American farmhouses but to Victorian England. Generally, most of the tiles were white and the black ones provided accents. Then as now, the tiles were easy to clean, and the white hue showed where spot cleaning was necessary. If the homeowner isn’t excited about the stark contrast between white and black, he or she might consider gray instead of black or tiles with speckles to create a subtle effect.

This type of Tile Flooring can be installed in bathrooms, too if the homeowner wants to coordinate the design. A variety of colors are available. The bathroom floor can be done in one solid color, in tiles of a heather pattern, or in a blend of different-colored tiles. The options allow people to easily color-coordinate the floor with other bathroom features, or they can choose more neutral colors such as beige, cream, natural stone, or light tan.

A company such as Anthony’s World of Floors is eager to work with homeowners on their renovation projects. Check out Anthonysworldoffloors.com for more details on the various possibilities. The flooring experts will point out all the details that must be considered. For instance, with the hex tile, even the color of the grout is important for the type of effect to be created. White may seem appealing, for instance, but it tends to show dirt.

Hexagon tiles are becoming trendy again, and the design will not look dated. It’s been some 60 years since those old hexagon floors began rapidly disappearing as homeowners had them torn out or covered up. These days, people increasingly appreciate the classic flooring look for kitchens and bathrooms. If they want to incorporate interior design that brings to mind a 100-year-old farmhouse or a Victorian-era cottage, the flooring provides the fundamental basis. A freestanding oversized claw-foot bathtub in a master bath matches very well with this kind of tile flooring, for example.

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